Tyros and the Aegean at Last!

After much uncertainty, indecision, and complications we finally made it to Tyros on the coast. Really, in retrospect, it didn’t take very long; four days in Athens and a full day of intermittent bus travel felt like a week and a half.

A large part of our indecision was how to get where we are going. The bus system seems to be the most common public transportation (trains not so much). We’re going to need a car for our next destination, so we considered renting one in Athens. That would require a return to Athens to drop it off, and we’re not keen to go back yet. Give us some time to miss Lime Bistro, Nonna’s Emotional Food and Vegan Nation and then we’ll be ready.

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The Bus

We are not early risers, and here in Greece our hours have slipped into the ridiculous. The kids wake up at 10 AM! This meant that the only bus option for us to get to Tyros was at 4:30 PM. Check out is 10 and the bus station is not located near anything interesting, so we weren’t too keen on that. I found a 12:30 bus to Tripolis and Google told me there are two rental car agencies in Tripolis, so off we went.

Cutie in the grass
This has nothing to do with our day, but is a nice picture of the Chica in her new coat.

It turns out that most businesses in Greece (in smaller cities) are closed on Sunday. Ouch. The next bus from Tripolis to Tyros was at 5 PM, 2.5 hours after our arrival. Double ouch. Lucky for us, our kids are champion travelers and can kill 2.5 hours in a bus station with ease and grace.

At 5 we boarded the bus, happy to be on the last leg of our journey for the day. Wrong. The bus pulled in to Astros, two villages before ours, and the driver took our bags off the bus, put them in the middle of the street and gestured “Get off the bus” with a shrug. We froke out.

Art installation in Athens
We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking up at the stars.

It turns out that there is no direct bus from Tripolis to Tyros. The guy at the bus station told us it would take an hour and a half. He neglected to mention the 1 hour at the Astros bus stop where you have to wait for the 4:30 bus from Athens!! ARRGGGHHHH!

So we killed another hour. Fortunately they sell (overpriced) beer at the Astros bus stop, so we did not remain froken out. We finally got on the right bus, the kids were nearly asleep, and we arrived. It took us 8 hours to get 200 km, and it was mostly our fault.

We (finally) Made It

All’s well that ends well, they say. I agree now that I’m sitting on a balcony overlooking the sea drinking a tiny Greek coffee.

Tyros is lovely.

 

Ian

I am a world-travelling, long distance runner previously disguised as a high-voltage engineer and now masquerading as a travel blogger.